ELITSERIEN | MAGIC MAX IN MALILLA

Polish racer Maciej Janowski stormed to a 14 paid 15-point maximum for Dackarna as they thumped visitors Masarna 59-31 in Sweden’s Bauhaus Elitserien on Tuesday. Janowski won the 2017 FIM British Speedway GP in Cardiff, and he heads into this year’s Principality Stadium on Saturday in red-hot form after going unbeaten over five rides in Malilla. Danish star Frederik Jakobsen also went unbeaten by an opponent on 12 paid 15, with his fellow countryman Rasmus Jensen racking up 12 paid 14 and Australia’s Brady Kurtz adding 11 paid 12. Polish star Krzysztof Buczkowski led the Masarna scorechart on nine. Elsewhere, Swedish star Freddie Lindgren raced to 11 points in Vastervik as the hosts triumphed 53-37 over Indianerna. Lindgren’s tally was only exceeded by an 11 paid 12-point tally from former World Under-21 champion Bartosz Smektala, while Wroclaw wild card Gleb Chugunov scored seven paid 10. Former world champion Chris Holder collected 14 points for the Indians, with Max Fricke notching eight paid 10. German ace Kai Huckenbeck cruised to 14 points for Rospiggarna as they won 49-41 at home to Piraterna. He was backed up by 11 paid 12 from Sweden’s Kim Nilsson, with Szymon Wozniak adding 10 paid 11 and Victor Palovaara scoring eight paid 11. British champion Adam Ellis bagged four paid five. Polish racer Oskar Fajfer starred for the Pirates on 13, with American star Luke Becker adding 12 paid 13 and Piotr Pawlicki picking up 11 paid 13. For the latest league table and more Bauhaus Elitserien stats, visit (in Swedish): https://www.svemo.se/Sporter/Resultat/Speedway/Serier/BAUHAUSLigan2022/Serietabell/

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HOLDER: IT SHOULD HAVE BEEN THREE IN CARDIFF

Former world champion Chris Holder may have topped the FIM Speedway GP of Great Britain – Cardiff podium in 2010 and 2012, but the Aussie believes it should have been three wins in a row. The 2012 Speedway GP world champion heads back to Principality Stadium as a special guest this Saturday as the series celebrates its 20th visit to the Welsh capital with an epic weekend of entertainment on and off the track, including the FIM SGP2 of Great Britain for the sport’s under-21 stars on Sunday. Holder stormed to his first Speedway GP victory in the 10th Cardiff event in 2012, before repeating the feat two years later on his way to the world title. But the Sydneysider is gutted not to have a Cardiff treble to his name. “I should have won it in 2011,” he said. “I made the start in the final. I remember gate one being terrible. I was off gate two again, which was good. But then (Emil) Sayfutdinov went down in the first corner. “I was in front and if you are in front in the final around there, by the end of the night it’s hard for the others to do much. But it got restarted and I had to try and do it again. “Of all the people you can have off gate one – no matter how good or bad it is – you don’t really want Nicki (Pedersen) because you know where you’re going. We all got pushed out and Greg (Hancock) just breathed in, snuck around the outside and that was it. “Out of all of them, that one annoys me the most. It would have been three in a row. If that race hadn’t got stopped, I was gone. But that’s how it goes. I still have a good record there, so I can’t complain about that.” Holder’s 2010 triumph is not only memorable for being his first Speedway GP win. He was also involved in a verbal altercation with Aussie legend Jason Crump on the way back to the pits after a hard-fought heat 14. Holder was far from happy with being run hard by JC on the back straight and was keen to voice his displeasure. But he admits it wasn’t just that incident which sparked the confrontation. He said: “I know it was the Grand Prix and the World Championship, but I felt like every time we raced each other, he was always extra hard on me. “I made a good start and went a little bit wide. When I watch it back, I had a little bit of room, but he just pushed me into the fence. The thing that annoyed me the most was I went from second to last. I just wanted to let him know I wasn’t very happy about it. I was only a young dude and I was fired up. “I wasn’t even hard done by; it was just hard racing. I can’t remember what I said to him, but I gave him a serve on the way back to the pits. But then he was pushing me away or pointing at me in my face, and I don’t like people pointing at me in the face. “But it was all good. It was all just heat-of-the-moment stuff. Nothing came from that and I just cracked on with the rest of the night. I managed to get the big one at the end so it all worked out.” The pair met again in the final that night, with Holder showing incredible composure to keep Crump at bay for four laps and take victory. He said: “I was stoked just to be in the final. Even for the final, I was thinking ‘just don’t finish last – get on the podium.’ Then I made a really good start off gate two. Jarek Hampel was off one and I did just enough to get over him. He pushed me up, but I still came out in front and rode four laps around the middle. “I was watching the big screen every time to see where they were and it worked out well. I knew Crumpy was buzzing around my back wheel, but I managed to snag the win and then it was just craziness. I probably did about 30 laps after the race! I couldn’t believe it – it was insane.” Celebrate 20 years of Speedway GP in Cardiff on Saturday with all tickets including entry to Sunday’s FIM SGP2 of Great Britain, featuring the sport’s under-21 stars. Secure your seats at Principality Stadium online here now: https://bit.ly/3ixX9wQ

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JANOWSKI: HOLDING HIS NERVE TO MAKE CARDIFF HISTORY

Wroclaw and Dackarna racer Maciej Janowski admits he had to hold his nerve after some start-line drama to become Poland’s first-ever FIM Speedway GP of Great Britain – Cardiff winner in 2017. Janowski made history five years ago when he become the first rider from the sport’s superpower nation to top the Principality Stadium podium. He bids to repeat the feat when the FIM British Speedway GP celebrates its 20th visit to the Welsh capital this Saturday (5pm UK time), with the FIM SGP2 of Great Britain taking place for the sport’s under-21 stars on Sunday (1pm). Janowski topped the 2017 heat scorechart on 13 points after five rides and thought he had made a dream start to his semi-final. Despite replays showing he didn’t move before the tapes lifted, referee Christian Froschauer hit the red lights and ordered a restart. Magic admits the decision left him baffled. “I was standing in front of the referee, asking ‘what’s going on?’” he said. “Then I realised ‘I need to go again. Focus Magic! Don’t think about that!’ “I was very disappointed about that decision. But then I realised I needed to focus. I was in a very good mood and my bike was prepared very fast on that night. I knew I just needed good reactions at the tapes, a nice first corner and then I could go to the final. “Even in the final when we had a re-run because someone moved at the start, my mechanics said ‘maybe we should change something because you lost that start a little bit and your momentum was not so good.’ But I told them ‘watch me now – I have got this.’ “This night was amazing. I remember in past years that everyone always talked about the Cardiff GP and how awesome it is. I remember Jarek Hampel was second in this event. I always wondered if I could get the first win for the Poles. I had many friends in this arena and many Polish fans. It was an amazing feeling. I have great memories from that day.” Janowski also has great memories of racing in the UK. He raced for Swindon in 2010 and 2011 and King’s Lynn in 2012, before leading the Poole Pirates to three straight Elite League titles between 2013 and 2015 – arguably the greatest years in the club’s history as he teamed up with icons like Chris Holder, Darcy Ward and Greg Hancock. Magic can’t wait to see his British fans at Principality Stadium this Saturday. He said: “It’s always great to come back to the UK. I really enjoyed riding in Britain for six years. It was an amazing experience for me as a young rider. I met many great people over there and fans. “I just want to say hello to my British fans. I can’t wait to see them. I am very happy that we are coming back to Cardiff and I hope they save their noise for the Cardiff GP because it will be hot! I will be very happy to see them all at the stadium, talk for a little bit and see my old friends.” Celebrate 20 years of Speedway GP in Cardiff on Saturday with all tickets including entry to Sunday’s FIM SGP2 of Great Britain, featuring the sport’s under-21 stars. Secure your seats at Principality Stadium online here now: https://bit.ly/3ixX9wQ

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CARDIFF BOOS NEVER SLOWED DANISH LEGEND PEDERSEN DOWN

Triple world champion Nicki Pedersen insists the pantomime boos never slowed him down as he returns to celebrate the 20th FIM Speedway GP of Great Britain – Cardiff this Saturday. Pedersen will be jetting into the Welsh capital, where he topped the podium in 2003 on his way to his first Speedway GP world title. The Dane looks set to get a great reception as he fights his way back from a broken hip and pelvis suffered in a PGE Ekstraliga match on June 5. Pedersen has always divided opinion with his tough racing style, meaning he often got a mixed reception when he lined up at Principality Stadium. But the Odense-born ace admits he didn’t mind if he was booed or cheered as he competed in Britain’s biggest arena motorsport event. He said: “I never had a problem with the booing. Some of the fans were cheering and some were booing. But I still sell tickets. People want to come and watch me. If they want to boo me, they are more than welcome. “You see many people do that and then you see them later on in the restaurants or in the town, and they come up with their kids and get an autograph. “It is what it is. I have never had a problem with that. Sometimes it boosts me even more. Then I am free to go and do whatever I want to do on the track. I have never done things for anyone else; I have always done things for myself. “If anyone thinks it’s good, that’s a bonus for all of us. It’s win, win. I have always been extremely strong in my mind. It didn’t ever affect me at all and I can’t say why. Some people would get affected by it and think ‘they don’t like me.’ But then it comes down to them having a problem with themselves rather than with the crowd. “There always needs to be a hero and there always needs to be a villain. There need to be characters and obviously I have been one of them. When I won it, everyone was cheering. I probably had boos halfway through the night anyhow, but it’s part of the game. They still respect me.” Pedersen looks back on his 2003 victory with huge pride. Speedway GP was staged using a 24-rider knockout format from 1998 to 2004. This meant Pedersen had to fight his way through the pre-main event to take on the top eight riders from the previous round in Avesta. “I think I had 11 starts and ended up doing nine races on that night,” Pedersen recalled. “I had two or three crashes too. But it was a fantastic night and great to win, especially in a place like Cardiff. I did that and it was a very nice feeling.” Victory in Cardiff has helped to elevate the careers of a host of world-class stars and it was certainly the ideal confidence boost for Pedersen in the first year when he truly emerged as a world-title contender. He said: “When you win a Grand Prix, you are up there and you know anything can happen if things fall in the correct place. When you win a Grand Prix, you just get hungrier. “I continued from there. Me, Jason Crump and Tony Rickardsson were in the top three at the last Grand Prix in Hamar. Cardiff was one of the steps towards getting where I did at the end of the season and being in the fight for the World Championship.” Aussie ace Crump was also chasing his first Speedway GP gold medal, having won silver in the previous two seasons. But Pedersen’s Cardiff win was just the boost he needed to make sure he got there first. “Finally it looked like Jason was going to take over from Tony,” Pedersen said. “Jason had been fighting for the World Championship for several years more than I had. He couldn’t really get over Tony. Finally he got above him, but then, from the sidelines, another Dane came along and I took it from him at the last minute. “I just got things working. I was 26 years old that year and I was very young. But I knew how to be consistent and tried to be strong, do my job and not think too much about things. “I also had a good team around me. We were fighting and we were honest with each other. We were working extremely hard and just taking it step by step. We were not arrogant – we knew it was a tough season.” Celebrate 20 years of Speedway GP in Cardiff on Saturday with all tickets including entry to Sunday’s FIM SGP2 of Great Britain, featuring the sport’s under-21 stars. Secure your seats at Principality Stadium online here now: https://bit.ly/3ixX9wQ

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CHUGUNOV GOES WILD IN WROCLAW

Wroclaw racer Gleb Chugunov roars back on to the World Championship stage after being named as wild card for the Betard FIM Speedway GP of Poland – Wroclaw on August 27. Chugunov lines up in the famous No.16 race jacket for the fifth time in three seasons, after serving as wild card in both the 2020 and 2021 Speedway GP double-headers staged at the Olympic Stadium. He reached the semi-finals at round two in 2020 and has emerged as one of Europe’s most exciting young talents. He’s a huge favourite among Wroclaw fans and played a pivotal role in their charge to a first PGE Ekstraliga championship in 15 years in 2021. Chugunov will have plenty of familiar faces alongside him in the Olympic Stadium pits as Wroclaw team mates Tai Woffinden, Maciej Janowski and Dan Bewley also race in the Betard FIM Wroclaw Speedway GP. He is joined in the line-up by track reserves Bartlomiej Kowalski and Wiktor Przyjemski. Kowalski is one of Wroclaw’s junior stars and lines up at No.17. Bydgoszcz shooting star Przyjemski is a member of this year’s SGP2 line-up and the 17-year-old sensation dons the No.18 race jacket.

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